Search Results for: State Arts Education Policy Database

ArtScan FAQ

AEP has compiled a list of Frequently Asked Questions to help users better understand the development, purpose, and scope of ArtScan. The FAQs below address many common questions and clarifications about ArtScan and the policies it contains.

 

Q: How was ArtScan developed?

A: In 2013, AEP merged its existing State Policy Database with ECS’ ArtScan database. AEP staff conducted a thorough search of each state’s education statutes and administrative codes to update this information for 2014.

Q: What are the sources of the information in ArtScan?

A: For the state policy information, AEP staff went directly to the primary sources in each state. Staff accessed state statutes and administrative code via each state’s relevant website.

The education indicators are selected data from the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics’ Digest of Education Statistics: 2012.

AEP conducted a Web search for surveys of access to arts education. The sources for these surveys vary by state, but the authors and funders of each study can be found in the full survey text (available in ArtScan).

Q: How frequently is ArtScan updated?

A:  ArtScan is updated on an ongoing basis to capture the most up-to-date information available. However, state governments vary widely in how frequently they refresh the content of their websites and the ease with which the information is accessible. Users are asked to notify AEP directly of any updates to state statutes or code contained in ArtScan.

Q: What are the criteria for a policy to be included in ArtScan?

A: Consistent with the original design of ArtScan, AEP used two criteria to identify policies to be included in ArtScan. Policies that do not meet both criteria are not included. The criteria are:

  1. The policies must specifically refer to the arts. This means that broad policies that cover all or most subjects but that do not reference the arts explicitly are not included.
  2. The policies must hold the weight of law.  This generally refers to the system of laws and regulatory measures that are found in either state statute or administrative regulations/code.

Q: What does “policy” mean?

A: For the purposes of ArtScan, policy refers to the system of laws and regulatory measures that pertain to arts education. ArtScan only includes policies that hold the weight of law and that explicitly refer to the arts. Broad policies that refer to all or most subjects are not included in ArtScan.

Q: What does “not found in statute or code” mean?

A: The “not found in statute or code” language means that AEP was unable to find policies that refer to the arts in a particular area. This is not meant to be a value judgment on a state’s arts education programs, but simply reflects that there is no explicit policy in statute or administrative code.

Q: How are the policy areas in ArtScan defined?

  • Arts as a Core Academic Subject – State defines the arts in statute or code as a core or academic subject.
  • Early Childhood Arts Education Standards – State adopted early childhood or pre-kindergarten content or performance standards for any or all disciplines of arts education.
  • Elementary and Secondary Arts Education Standards – State adopted elementary and secondary content or performance standards for any or all disciplines of arts education.
  • Arts Education Instructional Requirement—Elementary School – State requires school districts or schools to provide or offer arts instruction in one or more arts disciplines at the elementary school level.
  • Arts Education Instructional Requirement—Middle School – State requires school districts or schools to provide or offer arts instruction in one or more arts disciplines at the middle school level.
  • Arts Education Instructional Requirement—High School – State requires school districts or schools to provide or offer arts instruction in one or more arts disciplines at the high school level.
  • Arts Requirements for High School Graduation – State requires course credits in the arts for high school graduation.
  • Arts Alternatives for High School Graduation – State does not require course credits in the arts for high school graduation but may include arts courses (among other options) as an alternative requirement.
  • Arts Education Assessment Requirements – State requires state, district, or school-level assessment of student learning in the arts.
  • Arts Education Requirements for State Accreditation – State specifies arts education as a requirement for schools to be accredited.
  • Licensure Requirements for Non-Arts Teachers – State specifies arts requirements for initial licensure or certification of non-arts teachers.
  • Licensure Requirements for Arts Teachers – State specifies requirements for endorsement, initial licensure, or certification of arts teachers or arts specialists in one or more arts disciplines.
  • State Arts Education Grant Program or School for the Arts – State provides funding for an arts education grant program or a state-funded school for the arts.

Q: What is a “core academic subject”?

A: The definition of core academic subject requires that the state’s policy explicitly uses terms such as “core”, “academic”, “essential”, or “foundational” when referring to the arts.

Q: What is the difference between high school instructional requirements and high school graduation requirements?

A: While these areas are similar, they are approached differently in policy and have different implications. If a state has a high school instructional requirement in the arts, this means that schools must offer arts instruction but does not require that students receive it. An arts requirement for high school graduation means that students must complete a specified number of credits in the arts in order to graduate.

Q: What is an “arts alternative for high school graduation”?

A: States that have arts alternatives as graduation requirements are those that identify specific course/credit requirements that can be fulfilled by a closed set of disciplinary options, at least one of which is the arts. For example, a state might require students earn a credit that can be satisfied by classes in either the arts or career and technical education (CTE).

Q: Is the number of policies that a state has in place an accurate measure of a state’s commitment to arts education?

A: Not necessarily. Some states have historic or constitutional commitments that allow local school districts to exercise control over decisions for such areas as instruction, curricula, assessments, accountability, and graduation requirements. Additionally, some states may undertake substantive initiatives in particular policy areas without legal mandates to do so.  Education policy is best understood in terms of the multiple factors that influence its adoption and interpretation, including a state’s particular political, economic, historic and social context.

Q: Who should I contact if I have questions about my state’s arts education policies?

A: Please direct these inquiries to your state’s department of education. A listing of the arts education representatives in state education agencies is available from the State Education Agency Directors of Arts Education (SEADAE).

Q: Who should I contact if I have questions about ArtScan?

A: If you have questions about ArtScan or information about new policies in your state, please contact Cassandra Quillen.

ArtScan

 

 


Welcome to ArtScan! ArtScan, a project of the Arts Education Partnership, is a searchable clearinghouse of the latest state policies supporting education in and through the arts from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

You will find not only policy language excerpted directly from each state’s education policies but also information on state-level surveys of arts education and a set of descriptive education indicators (from the U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics’ Digest of Education Statistics: 2012).

For the purposes of ArtScan, “state policy” refers to the system of laws and regulatory measures that pertain to the provision of arts education. Only those policies that hold the weight of law and refer to the arts explicitly are included in ArtScan.

   

How to Use ArtScan

Below are five ways to engage with the data housed in ArtScan.

State Policies

Capture a snapshot of all the data ArtScan has to offer about your state including state policies in 14 policy areas, arts education survey information (when applicable), and state-level education indicators.

          _

State Comparisons

Create custom side-by-side comparison reports using a search engine that allows you to choose individual states and policy areas/data points of interest to you.

          _      

State Reports (All States)

Compare the policies of all 50 states and the District of Columbia within specific policy areas.

• Arts Education Instructional Requirements
• High School Requirements for Arts Education
• Arts Requirements for Educator Licensure
• Arts in Core Academic Subjects, Assessment, & Accreditation
• Surveys of Arts Education

          _      

2017 ArtScan at a Glance: Connecting the States and Arts Education Policy

Explore a summary of state policies for arts education identified in statute or code for all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

            _      

Research and Policy Briefs

Learn more about ArtScan and explore an analysis of the findings in A Snapshot of State Policies for Arts Education (March 2014).

           _      

ArtScan will be updated as new information becomes available. Please contact Cassandra Quillen with questions or updates.
     
           _      
          _      
To track the most recent policy updates:  

The ECS State Policy Database: Curriculum–Arts Education — ECS’ policy database—updated weekly—is made possible by your state’s fiscal support of ECS. Most entries are legislative, although rules/regulations and executive orders that make substantive changes are included.

 

About ArtScan

Since 1999, the Arts Education Partnership has tracked state policies for arts education in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. In 2013, AEP, with the cooperation of the Education Commission of the States, merged its State Policy Database with the ECS database, ArtScan. To update the information for the 2014 edition of ArtScan, AEP staff conducted a comprehensive search of state education statutes and codes on each state’s relevant websites. The new structure for the 2014 ArtScan allows users to explore the data in multiple ways, including a state level profile for all policy areas, a comparison of selected states and policy areas, and several types of 50-state reports.

National Arts in Education Week

In July of 2010, the U.S. House of Representatives passed House Resolution #275 designating the second week of September as National Arts in Education Week. The resolution expressed congressional support for arts education:

Whereas arts education, comprising a rich array of disciplines including dance, music, theatre, media arts, literature, design, and visual arts, is a core academic subject and an essential element of a complete and balanced education for all students.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get the facts about the benefits of arts learning for students and teachers. Did you know that arts learning is linked to positive student outcomes such as engagement and persistence, overall academic achievement, communication and collaboration, and positive behavior, among others? Visit ArtsEdSearch.org, a first-of-its-kind clearinghouse of arts education research, to learn more about these and other benefits of arts learning for teachers and students.

Find out what is going on in your school, district, and state. What are the policies in place in your community that either support or hinder student access and participation in arts learning? You can use ArtScan, AEP’s clearinghouse of arts education policies to find out information about your state. This searchable database contains the latest information on arts education state policies and practices in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Important Resources

The Arts Leading the Way to Student Success: A 2020 Action Agenda for the Arts in Education (2015) This action agenda will serve as the blueprint for the collective work of the Arts Education Partnership for the next five years. By addressing the four priority areas highlighted in this agenda, the Partnership will be moving toward the goal that, by the year 2020, every young person in America, at every grade level, will have equitable access to high quality arts learning opportunities, both during the school day and out-of-school time.

Preparing Students for the Next America (2013): AEP’s latest research bulletin offers a snapshot of how the arts support achievement in school, bolster skills demanded of a 21st century workforce, and enrich the lives of young people and communities. It draws on the research in AEP’s ArtsEdSearch.org, the nation’s first clearinghouse of research on the impact of arts education on students and their school communities. (Download the PDF)

What School Leaders Can do to Increase Arts Education (2011): As the top building-level leaders, school principals play a key role in ensuring every student receives a high-quality arts education as part of a complete education. This brochure-length guide, prepared by AEP with support from the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH) offers three concrete actions—supported by low-cost or no-cost strategies—school principals can take to increase arts education in their schools. (Download the PDF)

New Opportunities for Interest-Driven Arts Learning in a Digital Age, The Wallace Foundation (2013): This report delves into “interest-driven arts learning,” that is, exploration of the arts that emerges from children’s and teens’ own creative passions. The report identifies challenges and offers suggestions for future research, practice, and policy that build on current knowledge about interest-driven arts learning to enable more youth, particularly disadvantaged youth, to participate in the arts. (Download the full report)

The President’s Committee for the Arts and the Humanities (PCAH): In 2011, PCAH released a major report documenting the benefits and potential opportunities for the advancement of arts education. (Download the full report)

Arts Access in U.S. Schools (2009-10 FRSS): Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools: 1999-2000 and 2009-10, released by the U.S. Department of Education and its Institute of Education Sciences (IES), reports on data collected on student access to arts education and the resources available for such instruction. AEP and a coalition of partners have developed a toolkit for understanding, communicating, and utilizing the Arts Education in Public Elementary and Secondary Schools report. (Learn more)

Mission/Overview

Mission

The Arts Education Partnership, a national network of organizations, is a center within Education Commission of the States dedicated to advancing the arts in education through research, policy and practice.

Vision

Every student in America succeeds in school, work and life as a result of a high-quality education in and through the arts.

Our Belief

In school and out of school—each and every day—all children need the opportunity
…to create
…to perform
…to learn about and
…to experience
the arts in all forms, including dance, music, theatre, and visual arts.

Why the Arts?

Decades of research show the arts help all students to learn, achieve and succeed.

Learning in and through the arts develops essential skills and abilities:

  • Creativity, imagination and innovation
  • Problem solving and critical thinking
  • Communication and collaboration
  • Academic achievement
  • School, social and civic engagement

Benefits are greatest for low-income and at-risk students.

Yet, students who stand to benefit the most are least likely to have access to a high-quality arts education.

Who We Are

AEP is a national coalition of more than 100 education, arts, business, cultural, government, and philanthropic organizations. Click here to read more about AEP and Education Commission of the States.

What We Do

AEP serves as the nation’s hub for individuals and organizations committed to making high-quality arts education accessible to all U.S. students, improving arts education practice, and researching how art influences and strengthens American education. We serve our Partner Organizations by providing priority access to research and information, and creating opportunities for communication and collaboration between arts disciplines and across sectors on key education issues, which benefits their work with their constituents in schools and communities nationwide.

Research and policy: AEP is widely recognized as the leading source of objective and nonpartisan information about current and emerging arts education research, policies, issues, and activities of national significance. In collaboration with key Partners, AEP gathers, analyzes and disseminates evidence on how the arts contribute to student success. (Learn more about our research)

Advance critical dialogue: AEP serves as the nation’s hub for communicating and promoting reliable arts-based best practices that improve teaching and learning in and out of school. AEP’s Annual Convenings bring together leaders from around the country. Annual Convenings foster collaboration and action that helps secure the role of arts education in the curriculum.

Improve policy and practice: AEP Partners and their constituents do the on-the-ground work every day of making the case for arts education as a critical component of a complete education. AEP strives to make that job easier by providing accessible, easy-to-read language that is supported by evidence from the latest research. (Access the ArtsEdSearch database here)

Welcome

Welcome to the Arts Education PartnershipJBest (AEP) website. AEP is a national network of organizations dedicated to advancing the arts in education through research, policy and practice. AEP’s vision is that every student in America succeeds in school, work and life as a result of a high-quality education in and through the arts.

In late 2015, the National Endowment for the Arts and the U.S. Department of Education selected Education Commission of the States to serve as the new host organization for AEP. As a center within Education Commission of the States, AEP benefits from the exemplary reach and access the organization has to a wide-range of education stakeholders across the nation. We build on AEP’s 21-year legacy by providing partner organizations and the arts education community with the knowledge, tools and resources they need to elevate the narrative toward realizing our collective goals for the arts in education.

Research continues to shed light on how the arts are making a difference in not only improving academic performance and nurturing creativity, but also in fostering personal development – we are counting on both the arts and education communities to engage, take action and share promising practices for advancing student success though the arts.

Passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) presents renewed opportunity to highlight the importance of the arts as part of a well-rounded education. ESSA also brings great possibilities to AEP’s ongoing effort to leverage success stories across arts disciplines on how the arts contribute to academic achievement.

I encourage you to download The Arts Leading the Way to Student Success: A 2020 Action Agenda for Advancing the Arts in Education. This 2020 Action Agenda serves as the blueprint for the collective work for AEP and identifies four priority areas in which arts and education leaders can situate their work:

  • Raise Student Achievement and Success.
  • Support Effective Educators and School Leaders.
  • Transform the Teaching and Learning Environment.
  • Build Leadership Capacity and Knowledge.

While visiting the AEP website, I hope you take the time to explore the many resources available that AEP offers, such as the ESSA and the Arts page, a compilation  of resources from the field and across AEP partner organizations, ArtScan, a 50-state database of arts education policies and ArtsEdSearch, a clearinghouse of research on the benefits of arts in education for both students and educators. Visit the publications page where you will find a variety of resources on the arts in education, all downloadable at no cost. Stay tuned to the ArtsEd Digest for updates on the work of AEP and its partner organizations. Finally, AEP welcomes the opportunity for you to connect with us, share your arts education endeavors and let us know how we all might benefit from one another’s meaningful work.

It is an exciting time for the arts in education!

Sincerely,

Jane R. Best, Ph.D.
Director, Arts Education Partnership